Checking in after one month in Mexico

Mmmmm, tacos….

With a month living in Mexico now under our belts thought I’d just share some of the unique things we’ve found living south of the border. 

Street dogs

It’s pretty rare in the US to see a dog just walking around without an owner near it, but you’re apt to see several here any time you go for a walk. Most don’t seem to be strays or feral, they’re just dogs that probably belong to a specific neighborhood or roam around the streets before returning to their house. 

They’re almost all friendly and don’t really bug you or chase you. It’s really weird honestly because sometimes I’ll be out for a walk and out of nowhere a dog will just show up along side me and start walking at the same speed as me. If he could talk you could almost imagine him saying “You going this way? Me too, I’ll walk with you for awhile.” Then he just turns up a different street after awhile, going to do whatever it is he does. 

Either way, there’s plenty of food for them to eat because of…

Garbage collection

At least in our neighborhood you just leave your garbage out on designated corners and the garbage trucks come around at seemingly random times. Sometimes in the middle of the day, sometimes in the middle of the night. There’s no rhyme or reason to it. There’s actually some trash cans on our closest corner, which is rare — in other corners of the neighborhood the garbage just sits on the corner and inevitably some animal or another will tear into it looking for something to eat and so that corner ends up just kind of littered with trash for awhile. 

Food prices

In general, everything is much, much cheaper, though anything that needs to be imported from the US is probably gonna cost more here than it did in the States (which makes sense). I typically eat a lunchmeat sandwich for lunch and the quality of the ham here is largely no bueno, so I’ve taken to eating turkey instead, but it’s expensive — roughly as much as lunch meat costs in the US, itself not cheap. 

Fortunately, bread and vegetables are cheap and plentiful. Every supermercado has its own bakery which produces inexpensive quality breads, rolls and tortillas and there are several panaderias and tortillerias around the neighborhood as well. 

Most anything you can think of probably costs about 25 percent to 50 percent less than the US otherwise with the exception of most other meats — those are a little cheaper than the US, but not much. 

LGBTQ people

This one is unique to Puerto Vallarta, since PV is either the LGBTQ capital of Latin America or close to it. There are dozens of businesses in the Zona Romantica especially, but all over town that cater to that market, including some you’d stereotypically expect like drag bars, all-male strip clubs and music (showtunes, Streisand, Cher, etc.) revues, but there are also several entire resorts and restaurants that cater to just the LGBTQ community. 

Since we’ve only been here for a month, not sure if this is just a pandemic thing or the normal breakdown, but the number of Latino couples is almost as many as the Americans/Canadians. I’m guessing that might be true even post-pandemic since unfortunately it’s not as socially acceptable yet in a lot of parts of Latin America to show public affection, so it’s really nice to be walking along the Malecon and see a Latin couple holding hands, realizing that might not be something they can do as openly wherever they’re visiting from. 

Street food

Hey, we talked about street dogs, why not street food? The number of places producing street food around town frankly is overwhelming, but it all smells delicious and we mostly haven’t been able to indulge yet, partly because we’re trying to cut costs by eating more at home for the time being. There are a few carts in the neighborhood that I’m absolutely going to have to hit up before too long though because the smell when you walk past them is amazing. My knowledge (or lack thereof) of Spanish is a little intimidating but I think I have enough to be able to do a basic food transaction, so that’s something I’m definitely looking forward to. 

Most of the carts are geared towards what you would expect. Basic Mexican fare like arrachera and pollo tacos or tostadas, but thanks to the proximity to the ocean there are many mariscos carts where you can get shrimp, marlin or octopus tacos and burritos. I’ve already had a couple of shrimp burritos from small restaurants here in the neighborhood and they’re amazing. 

This is just a small list to start and really doesn’t include stuff I could complain about, but won’t — for the moment. Most of my complaints for the moment are small potatoes (figuratively, though you can’t really get large potatoes here) and/or stuff that nothing can be done about like mosquitos or the kid in the house next door that screams bloody murder 23 hours a day. But hoping that moving to our new place in three weeks brings better luck in both of those departments. 

Published by Brian

Your humble narrator on a hopefully epic journey.

2 thoughts on “Checking in after one month in Mexico

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